When music takes you sky high!

If you could fly over A Butler’s Manor — literally fly, it might look like the view over the house and gardens, beautifully captured in our brand new drone video by the talented team of JJ Photo and Dave King. It all started out through music.aerial view over property showing large house, pool, and extensive gardens

We’ve just added this magnificent video to our website. Check it out!

We’re winding up our 2020 high season under the COVID-19 cloud. As you can imagine, it’s been a summer where live entertainment has been difficult to find. By mid-July, when the Hamptons were cleared for Phase 4 Reopening, businesses and attractions around here were getting creative. There have been monthly Friday Night concerts on the patio of the Parrish Art Museum, outdoor concerts at the Southampton Arts Center, drive-in movies at Cooper’s Beach…all socially distanced, but with an understanding of the pent-up demand for entertainment in a form other than via Netflix.

man playing guitar outside surrounded by trees and grassChris and I are lovers of live music, and one of the casualties of COVID this year for us was the summertime Wednesday night Concerts in the Park series, curated by the Southampton Cultural Center. So we were especially excited to meet Dave and Jackie, who first stayed with us early in July. Dave is an accomplished singer/songwriter and gifted us and our other guests in residence with an impromptu open-air concert on one of the nights of their visit…a spark of joy during this somber pandemic year.

Jackie and Dave are a creative pair. Music, videography, photography, horsemanship (!) and more are talents they share between them. And they don’t stop working even when they are on vacation, something Chris and I can relate to. On their second visit, in addition to filming A Butler’s Manor, they shot a music video at the pool and at our favorite beach.

I Got The Sun Shining Down on Me

Usually, as we approach Labor Day, I’d be cueing up  Shotgun Wedding’s Tumbleweed Tuesday (also shot here in the Hamptons), but Life is uncertain these days and we don’t think the usual summer crowd is actually vacating after Labor Day this year. So Dave’s song is my current anthem — let’s keep Summer rolling as long as possible!

We are so grateful for all of our guests who have trusted us to provide them a safe haven during these scary times. As Autumn approaches, we believe our best times are ahead of us. While grounded for now, we will soar again, and in the meantime, may music or whatever makes you happy soothe and energize you. Come visit us and celebrate the change of seasons!

Bike to the Hamptons

 

You’ve been cooped up for lo, these many weeks and now–finally!–the weather and the COVID restrictions are such that you can dare to venture outside and breathe the air! And you’re considering a trip to the Hamptons. But oh, wouldn’t it be great to combine it with some well-needed exercise?

We’ve got an idea for you.

Gotham Bicycle Tours is a bicycle touring company located in New York City, and they’ve recently developed the Hamptons Bicycle Adventure: They tote your bags, provide the bicycles and the guides, and you pedal out to visit us in Southampton where you arrive feeling virtuous and ready for a dip in our saltwater pool.

Most Manhattan residents will note that if they were to actually ride out from NYC, they’d be facing a 90-mile ride. Probably way too much unless this is your passion. So Gotham has designed its Hamptons Adventure to start on Long Island, somewhere you can easily get to by train or car (and park there) and ride from that point. Are you up for 40 miles from Ronkonkoma train station? Prefer 20 miles from Westhampton? They are quite open to customization. Your bags arrive before you do, the bikes are picked up and you are free to enjoy the remainder of your time away with bicycles you can rent on-site from Pedal Share.

Or maybe you’d rather save the exercise for when you get here and have had a night’s rest: Gotham offers day trip excursions out to Montauk, or Amagansett, or Sag Harbor.

What if I get a flat? Or I just can’t make it that far? Or I got a cramp in my foot and need to stop? No problem: Gotham has drivers spotting you. Your only responsibility is to watch the road and enjoy the ride.

With each mile away from home, the scenery gets better, the air gets fresher, the noise quiets…Riding a bike to the Hamptons may be the perfect way to enjoy the outdoors after what seemed like an endless Spring in quarantine!

 

Full bloom at the Summer Solstice!

close up of purple columbine flowers in garden

There are many aspects of my new job as an Innkeeper that I’ve been enjoying, but none as much as the awakening of the garden and how it seems to be in sync with the awakening of the Hamptons.

Man in a bowler hat carrying cleaning supplies to clean a roomWhen we arrived in early April, there wasn’t much visible life in the gardens outside my window. I felt the same way when I went out to explore the villages and hamlets that make up the Hamptons. I was surprised to find quiet streets, shuttered storefronts and farmstands that seemed to be abandoned. Thank goodness most of the wineries were alive and kicking!

Having lived in the Colorado Rockies for the past eight years, part of the reason Ralph and I took this assignment was to spend some time on the East coast again and meet wonderfully
interesting people. We also wanted to experience a change of scenery and have some fun with the Hamptons “scene.”

We didn’t have to wait long before we spotted Alan Alda dining at Bistro Ete, a small, French-inspired dining spot in Water Mill. We’ve marked our calendars to attend the annual Artists and Writers Celebrity Softball Game in East Hampton, hoping to get a glimpse of Alec Baldwin and Bill Clinton while they slug it out to benefit local organizations that provide vital human services to the East End. And there’s nothing stressful that can happen in a day that taking a walk on Cooper’s Beach can’t cure, so the salty air has been a calming balm on our busy days.

large stand of pale pink roses all in bloom around a fountain

In the meantime, like the area itself, the garden has sprung into full bloom. The roses made their appearance last week, following several weeks of multicolored iris, alliums, azaleas, and peonies! And our vegetable garden is producing much that we’re using in our healthy breakfasts, including asparagus, swiss chard, and lots of herbs. Bliss!
close up of swiss chard in garden
When we’re not watching others engage in playing sports, Ralph and I are fiercely competitive with each other playing ping pong. So when we learned that the 324 Lounge in East Hampton was hosting ping pong parties every Friday night, we got really excited. We’re used to playing in our cold and damp garage in Colorado, so upgrading to a chic, hip, hot spot in the Hamptons is an exciting night out for us! Loser buys lobster rolls at Bostwick’s on the Harbor!

Between hosting guests from around the world and exploring our new surroundings, the time is flying and it’s hard to believe we’re almost halfway through our season with A Butler’s Manor.

Several couples enjoying breakfast on the garden patio

Looking forward to meeting and sharing our Hamptons fun and experiences with you at A Butler’s Manor, our Southampton bed and breakfast…and your home in the Hamptons!

Warmest regards,

— Dina

SSHH (second in a series): All Buildings great and small

Sagaponack Village's Establishment sign in front of the office
Settled in 1653, Incorporated in 2005 – in self defense.
No, this isn’t a post about the massive summer “cottages” here in the Hamptons (although that in itself is always a great tour). It’s about a few more of the places to be found on our Selfie Scavenger Hunt of the Hamptons (SSHH) that was the subject of my last blog. SSHH is our tour game highlights some of the cool and interesting places off the beaten path that aren’t going to be found on some gossipy click-bait article titled “10 Top Things To See In The Hamptons (That You Can Then Brag About).”
Today we’re in and around the greater Bridgehampton area.
So to begin, here’s irony for you: The village that contains the largest house in the Hamptons also features the smallest of schools. Tiny Sagaponack  and its neighboring hamlet Wainscott each boast operational one room schoolhouses.
Red, barnlike building that houses Sagaponack School, a one-room schoolhouse
Sagaponack School dates back to 1776, though its current building, housing 14 students in grades K-4 was built in 1885. Sagg School’s earlier structure, constructed in the early 1800s was moved to Wainscott, where it still is in use for its 20 students in grades K-3.
Small shingled buidling that houses Wainscott School, a one-room schoolhouse

 

Probably 90% of the school taxes for Sagaponack School (and a substantial portion of those higher grade schools it feeds into) are paid through the property taxes of this behemoth:

 

An enormous (66,000 square feet) private house behind beach grasses
Yep, that’s one house. The rough unpaved road is intentional.

Sagaponack School’s original 500 square feet building is probably the equivalent of one guest bedroom in this 64,000 square foot mansion owned by junk bond billionaire Ira Rennert. Called Fair Field, it is one of the largest private houses in the country and sits on 68 acres of oceanfront property. In addition to the main house, there are several outbuildings, bringing the total of structures on the acreage to over 110,000 square feet.

A huge hue and cry was raised by neighbors when Rennert began building the complex. Though they were unsuccessful at halting the construction, the lawsuits did result in new, stricter restrictions on house size in Southampton Township…and to the incorporation of tiny Sagaponack as a separate village rather than just a “Hamplet” of Southampton Town.

(Perhaps as poetic justice for those appalled locals, a federal appeals court ordered Rennert to pay a $213 million judgment, upholding a lower court decision that found him guilty of looting money from one of his mining companies in order to fund the construction of Fair Field.)

Heading northwest from Sagaponack, past potato farms interspersed with horse properties, polo fields and a golf course, you may happen upon another house on a substantial plot of land that certainly doesn’t look like any other house in the Hamptons. Maybe even the world:

Two odd-shaped houses, one with a red zigzag door, one round with bright blue sides
This is called the Elliptical House, and yes, it is a residence. The house, barn, and dozens of oversized sculptures sit on the grounds of Novas Ark Project, the creation of the late artist Nova Mihai Popa. Situated on 95 acres and fronting an agricultural preserve, the property (though not the house) is often rented for large events and weddings. Chris and I call it “More Input, Stephanie,” because we think it resembles the robot featured in the movie “Short Circuit.” "Short Circuit Need Input" robot from movie "Short Circuit"
Finally, as you enjoy the drive on Scuttlehole Road through the middle of the South Fork, keep your eyes peeled for buildings that may not look as though they belong here, but oh, they do:
potato barn traditionally half-buried in an earthen berm
These are potato barns, and they’re purposely designed partway underground because they act as an enormous root cellar, keeping the potatoes naturally cool until they are shipped. Very occasionally you might spot a house that once began as a potato barn and was converted to a private residence. (Extra SSHH points if you do!) To me, potato barns are wonderful iconic structures, and as much part of the Hamptons charm as the villages that draw our visitors.
So got your cellphone? Ready to explore? Come visit A Butler’s Manor, Southampton’s best boutique inn, and we’ll help you see parts of the Hamptons that most people miss out on!

SSHH…best kept secrets in the Hamptons!

a tranquil duck pond with a bowler hat on a fence in the foreground
Respite from too much shopping in East Hampton Village?

We get two main types of leisure (as opposed to business) visitors here at A Butler’s Manor: those who live within about a 100 mile radius and return, often year after year, for a few days each summer, and those for whom a visit to the Hamptons checks off a bucket list item. Long ago, for these latter guests Chris and I compiled an itinerary to aid first-timers in maximizing their visit to our area. It remains popular and we go through several hundred copies each year.

We were on our winter sabbatical in California and attending a Jaguar car rally where you were tasked with navigating via landmarks (we won, by the way, yay!), when it occurred to me that it would be fun to go beyond the itinerary and offer folks who were so inclined an opportunity to discover some of the fun and funky corners of the Hamptons that make it special to us. And to do it in a way that created a personal photo album of the trip in the process.

So we created A Butler’s Manor Selfie Scavenger Hunt of the Hamptons (hereafter SSHH). The idea is to find as many of the locations as you can, take a picture of yourself at each, hashtag it #abutlersmanor and post it on social media if you desire…but regardless, experience a broader view of the area than just Montauk Highway and our famous beaches.Chris and Sydney were out and about in East Hampton last week, so Chris took one of our bowlers and stopped by some of the SSHH locations. Here’s a small sampling of his trip that I’ll title “Who’s Who Who Was (or is) Here.”

Smiling man wearing a bowler hat in front of the plate glass window of the East Hampton Star newspaper
Chris is here!

I wrote about Jackson Pollock and the Pollock/Krasner House a few years back (read it here). Many people know that Jackson Pollock lived–and was killed in an automobile accident–in the Springs in East Hampton, but you may not know that he is buried here too (as is his wife Lee Krasner). Following his death, Green River Cemetery became famous as an artists and writers cemetery–many of the headstones are works of art in themselves.

Boulder with brass plate that is the headstone for artist Jackson Pollack, with a fluffy orange dog in the foreground
Sydney at Jackson Pollock’s Grave

LongHouse Reserve is a 16-acre sculpture garden founded by textile artist and collector Jack Lenor Larsen. Located in Northwest Woods, there are magnificent lawns and border gardens and a pond, all created with an eye to the display of contemporary sculpture. The Japanese-inspired main house is serene and in harmony with the surrounding gardens. It’s open to the public for a small fee on Wednesday and Saturday afternoons, or by appointment.

concrete sign for LongHouse Gardens, with a bowler hat perched atop it
LongHouse Reserve

Lion Gardiner was an English soldier who established the first English settlement in what would become the state of New York. Predating the 1648 founding of East Hampton, Gardiner purchased in 1639 an island off the coast of what is now the Springs and Montauk from the Montaukett Indian tribe. The King of England granted Lion Gardiner a Royal Patent “to possess the land forever,” and until the end of the American Revolution, it was not connected with either New York or Connecticut but was an entirely separate and independent “plantation.” Nearly 380 years later, Gardiners Island is still owned by his descendants, one of the larger private islands in the USA.

Highly detailed stone crypt with a carved knight in armor laid to rest within; the grave of Lion Gardiner
Lion Gardiner’s Crypt, with recumbent effigy

 

So, does this whet your appetite to find some of the lesser-known corners of East Hampton? Come visit A Butler’s Manor, our New York Bed and Breakfast, and we’ll set you up with the goods!